Posts Tagged ‘links’

STREAMLINE:

START OVER

TRASH TREASURE OR TRANSFER

REASON FOR EACH ITEM

EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE

ALL SURFACES CLEAR

MAKE USE OF MODULES / CONTAINERS

LIMITS

IF SOMETHING COMES IN SOMETHING GOES OUT

NARROW IT DOWN

EVERYDAY MAINTENANCE

Via: Miss Minimalist

Writing with DASH

Posted: May 14, 2015 in graffiti living, links
Tags: ,

Useful approach to writing on deadline:

Writing does not begin until your fingers start synchronizing with what’s on your mind. Everything else is wasted time if your intention is to write.

via Writing with DASH.

I prefer the Douglas Adams approach.

I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by. — Douglas Adams

Writing advice from David Hewson:

If a project’s working I don’t need prompts. I’m desperate to know who these people are, what their story is, how it will resolve (because it certainly won’t be exactly as I originally pictured it – their own characters will determine that).

via Advice from David Hewson | Writing advice from leading authors | Gotham Writers' Workshop.

Hewson wrote a good book on Writing a Novel with Scrivener and the writing insights on his blog are always interesting.

A historian academic’s ethos and approach to academic research:

A colleague of mine told me that he’s been Only Collecting for over ten years, and can now knock out a 3000 word paper in under two days, simply because all his material is already at hand; it exists in the stuff he’s picked up in his intellectual infancy and adolescence, which at the time he didn’t know how to use, and perhaps didn’t even know was important.

via Only Collect | a historian's craft.

There’s a lesson in this for writers — collect and connect.

Joshua

Joshua Fields Millburn, of The Minimalists, on killing the internet (at home) in the name of productivity:

The internet is not evil, just like candy is not evil. But if your entire diet consists of candy, you get sick and fat fairly quickly. Thus, I don’t keep bags of candy at home, just like I don’t keep the internet at home anymore either.

via Killing the Internet at Home Is the Most Productive Thing I’ve Ever Done – The Minimalists.

I saw The Minimalists do a book reading in Leeds as part of their worldwide book tour for Everything That Remains.

One of the things that came across more in real-life is just how funny the guy is.

Getting rid of the internet at home is great advice which I fully endorse. On my blog. Via the internet.

The irony of this doesn’t escape me, but you can schedule posts in advance and learn to make the most of your online time.

I’ve gone for long stretches without internet access at home (up to about a year at a time) — it’s painful but instructive.

I just wish that wi-fi, or ideally broadband, was ubiquitous so not having the internet at home was a no-brainer rather than an edge-case.